Tag Archives: war

The Divergent Trilogy (Divergent, Insurgent, Allegiant) by Veronica Roth

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“A brave man acknowledges the strength of others.”
-Four, Divergent

Many years in the future, the city of Chicago has been split into five factions: Abnegation, the selfless; Amity, the peaceful; Candor, the honest; Dauntless, the brave; and Erudite, the intelligent. Each faction has specific jobs and requirements that must be made in order to join. At the age of sixteen, a choice must be made: whether to leave the faction of your parents that you’ve grown up in, or to transfer to another faction. After a simulation that is supposed to show her what her strongest aptitude is, Beatrice Prior learns that she is Divergent, or has equal aptitude for three different factions. This revelation causes her to rethink her previous idea about the factions, and her decision will transform her into a completely different person.

I tried to write that summary without any spoilers, so I apologize if it seems a little vague and uninteresting, because it’s truly anything but. The Divergent trilogy is reminiscent of trilogies like The Hunger Games and The Maze Runner, due to the dystopian future and survival themes, and this trilogy is just as action-packed and compelling. If it weren’t for the trouble I had finding the second and third books, I would’ve had this entire series read within a few days.

Not only do I love the action and suspense in these books, but the numerous themes are also a big deal to me. It’s like Veronica Roth just decided to write about absolutely everything she could think of to try to fit the books into every category possible. And I don’t just mean that this is an action/romance/sci-fi/suspense novel, but the fact that she decided to take nearly every problem a person could be faced with and let the characters struggle with them. The ability to do all of that and still make it work, I think, is what makes this series even more incredible than it would have been.

This trilogy also has a growing fandom, and that fact is an even better reason to try out these books. Although Allegiant, the final book in the trilogy, was released only two months ago, Veronica Roth has already announced a series of short stories from Four’s point of view will be published as an anthology in February. Additionally (and yes, I realize I’ve been ending a lot of my reviews with this sort of statement, but that just means they’re good books, right?), the film adaption for Divergent will be out in March, starring Shailene Woodley and Ansel Elgort (who will also be playing Augustus and Hazel in the The Fault in Our Stars film adaption) as Beatrice and her brother Caleb.

I’m going to use the end of this post to do a little promotion for the Divergent Fandom WordPress blog, in case you’ve already read the series and want to check it out. It’s a great site that you should definitely check into if you’ve read and enjoyed the series. Thanks for reading, and happy New Year!

-J

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The Hush, Hush Series by Becca Fitzpatrick (Hush, Hush, Crescendo, Silence, Finale)

“Any happiness, no matter how brief, seemed better than the long, simmering torture of waking up day after day, knowing I could never have him.”
-Nora

Romance was not part of Nora Grey’s plan. She’s never been particularly attracted to the boys at her school, no matter how hard her best friend, Vee, pushes them at her. Not until Patch comes along. With his easy smile and eyes that seem to see inside her, Patch draws Nora to him against her better judgment. But after a series of terrifying encounters, Nora’s not sure whom to trust. Patch seems to be everywhere she is and seems to know more about her than her closest friends. She can’t decide whether she should fall into his arms or run and hide. And when she tries to seek some answers, she finds herself near a truth that is way more unsettling than anything Patch makes her feel.

I’m a little lazy today, so that summary is directly from Goodreads.com. Considering the cover art of the series pictured above, I don’t think it’s a spoiler to tell you that Patch is a fallen angel. I mean, it’s almost screaming it at you. So, not only are there fallen angels in this fantasy world, there are also fallen angel-human hybrids called Nephilim, and that’s where it gets tricky. Basically, fallen angels can possess the body of a Nephil during the Jewish month of Cheshvan (which I’ve tried to look up and figure out exactly when it is, but so far, I’ve got nothing) if they swear fealty to the fallen angel. This will, in turn, make them immortal, like the fallen angel who possesses them. Fallen angels and Nephilim generally despise each other, not only due to the possession, but the fact that fallen angels created Nephilim.

I can’t say much more without destroying the plot of the entire series, but that’s the main premise. Also, fallen angels can’t physically feel, so there’s the whole forbidden love thing. You get the idea. So how about the actual review?

Honestly, I have mixed feelings about the series. I remember when I read Hush, Hush for the first time, I absolutely loved it and couldn’t wait to get the sequel. About a year later, I re-read Hush, Hush and read Crescendo for the first time, and I remember loving it just as much. But recently, when I got Silence and Finale and read the entire series, my feelings about them had changed. Maybe I read them too many times, maybe I grew out of them, and maybe it’s the fact that I was reading multiple books in a row. Who knows? The thing is, I really didn’t like them very much, and I struggled to finish Silence because it was so boring for so long. And once I’d finally finished that one, I didn’t even want to read Finale. I was so sick of the entire series that I was ready to just give up, write a terrible review on half of the series to emphasize my hatred with the previous book, and be done with the whole ordeal. But, I didn’t. And in a way, I’m glad I didn’t, because Finale was definitely the best of all four novels and the only one I didn’t feel like I was wasting my time reading. The suspense leading up to the main plot point is great, the training is great, and the characters have visibly matured since the first installment.

I’d say overall, not bad. Some parts were cliché, yes, but others were great. Some well-liked characters I hated, but others I liked. The series was meh, excluding Finale.

Now, a little pathetic apology note: I actually finished the series yesterday, and I don’t really have an excuse for why I didn’t write the review then. However, between then and now I finished another book, which I’m currently multi-tasking on writing the review for and getting distracted on Tumblr. It’ll definitely be up before I go to bed, though, and it’s a good one.

Anyway, guys, thanks for reading, and I’ll be back soon with another review!

-J

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Tempest by Julie Cross

Tempest

“Forget everything you think you know about time travel.”
-Jackson

Nineteen-year-old Jackson has a secret: he can time travel, but the things he can change in the past don’t affect the future. He hasn’t told anyone but his genius friend Adam, who is trying to help him understand the limits of his ability. But one day, two men appear and shoot Jackson’s girlfriend, Holly. He ends up jumping to a different time in surprise, and finds himself stuck in 2007– two years ago, before he had even met Holly. He spends his time getting to know Holly all over again, and in doing so finds out nearly everything he knew in his old life was a lie. Now Jackson is left wondering who to trust, and he must choose before time runs out and the so-called Enemies of Time come back for him…

You probably don’t know this considering the books I’ve been reviewing, but I’m really into things that mess with your head. Some film examples that immediately come to mind are The Butterfly Effect, The Prestige, Inception, and Frailty. I’m just going to assume that you’ve seen or heard of at least one of these incredible movies. Now, imagine one of those types of movies, but in book form. That’s kind of what Tempest was like: you think you know something, but then you get further in and realize you don’t know anything. And it just gets worse (and by worse, I mean better), because Tempest is a planned trilogy, with an added prequel.

So, I should probably say something about the book itself. In short, here’s what I’ve come up with:

  • Characters: awesome. Other than the obvious antagonists, I don’t think there was anyone I really disliked, and this doesn’t happen often.
  • Pace: perfect. At no point did I feel the story was moving too fast or slow, which made me not want to stop reading.
  • Twists/major revelations: awesome. Just awesome.
  • Action/suspense: yes.
  • Definitely not as confusing as I probably made it out to be.
  • Also, I commend this book for being one of the few with a female love interest who doesn’t totally suck. (*Cough, cough,* Martyn Pig; Jerk, California; and Twisted. Grrr.)

Well, there you have it. Short and sweet and straight to the point. If I had to grade this book, I’d say A-. (We can’t all be perfect.)

By next week I’ll most likely have up the series review for the Hush, Hush series by Becca Fitzpatrick, which is a paranormal romance sort of thing. I haven’t reviewed many books of this genre, so it should be interesting. Hope to see you then!

-J

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The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Great Gatsby

“Reserving judgments is a matter of infinite hope.”
-Nick

So, after just recently learning that a.) my school doesn’t teach this book and b.) the movie just came out, I went to the library and checked out The Great Gatsby. Already I knew it was one of those “classic literature” books that English teachers love and students hate, which immediately made me think, “Well, this is going to suck.” I just finished it last night, and I think I’ve waited enough time to let it soak in before writing the review. So here it is: The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

I’m not really sure how to give a summary for this one. There’s undoubtedly a lot going on in this book, so it’s hard to decide which point to focus on. I guess I’ll say it’s about Nick Carroway, a 1920s-era businessman who moves into a home next door to millionaire Jay Gatsby. This summary, taken from a reviewer on Goodreads, seems to sum everything up much better than I can:

Told from the perspective of Nick Carroway, a young man who lives in the house between Gatsby’s mansion and Tom Buchanan’s home across the Sound.
The 1920’s….a time of women becoming independent, of ravish parties and of young people losing themselves in the magic of the night. Outstanding parties, a war of love, the eyes above the ash pile, drinks and cars, oh my!

Gatsby is mysterious, trailed by constant rumors (“I believe he was an Oxford man.”, “He once killed a man.”, “He’s a gambler!”) and a murky love life. His parties are meant to please while he observes, quiet and unassuming in the background.
But do people really care for the man, or do they just like his ever-pleasant hospitality and abundance of drinks?
Behind his daring ‘get-togethers’, Gatsby is simply a sad man whose mind is glued to the past.

Daisy…the woman he loves is married to none other than Tom Buchanan, a brute of a man (not to mention racist and sexist) whose suspicions of Gatsby run deep.
Nick Carroway befriends dear Gatsby and is the calm observer of this affair. After five years of not seeing one another, Nick gets Gatsby to speak to Daisy again.

This is a story the delusion of dreams, and that of a man who has gone down in history as….”The Great Gatsby

Okay, so to the actual review.

Honestly, I’m not sure what to say. After about the first chapter or so, I realized, surprisingly, that I liked the book. It was interesting, mysterious, and I definitely wanted to keep reading. After Nick goes to Gatsby’s party, I started to realize how badly I wanted to see the movie already. But then it started to get slow. It was repetitive, hopping from affair to scandal like there was nothing else going on. And although it ended with a bang, but I’m still unsure of how I feel about it as a whole.

I am thoroughly surprised I liked it as much as I did, though. This is definitely not my kind of book, and yet I’m so excited to rent the movie this week. I might write a review of the movie adaption and add it onto the next review I post, or depending on how long it is, make it a separate post, so watch out for that. Thanks for reading!

-J

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Love is the Higher Law by David Levithan

Love is the Higher Law

“The secret to living long is to have something to live for.”

Well, it’s a little late, but I promised you a review within the next few days and here it is. This is the only 9/11 book I’ve ever read, and I’m having some mixed feelings. Like I said in my review for The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, I’m really not too interested in history-related books, so this is a little new to me. Okay, here we go.

Love is the Higher Law focuses on the New York City area during 9/11. There are three sides to this story: Claire, who is in school when it happens; Jasper, who sleeps through it, oblivious to the situation; and Peter, who witnesses the attacks firsthand. Their separated stories are told, and eventually the three meet (Claire goes to school with Peter and meets Jasper by chance, and Peter and Jasper had a date planned for that night before they knew) and their stories mix.

This is a great book, don’t get me wrong. It’s just not my thing. I know there’s not a lot of 9/11 YA novels out there, and I’m really glad that I found one and read it. But now I know it’s not my type of book. I do like that David Levithan mixed so many elements into one book, and it kept my attention through its very short span. If this is the kind of book you’re into, definitely read it, and if it’s not, at least give it a try.

-J

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The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne

The Boy in the Striped Pajamas

“Despite the mayhem that followed… nothing in the world would have persuaded him to let go.”

Wow. This book is just… wow. I read it all in two sittings, with no regrets whatsoever. Usually I despise history, or anything history related, but I’m officially interested in Holocaust/WWII/concentration camp books.

Almost everyone who noticed me carrying around this book today said they had watched the movie and cried. As of now, I haven’t seen the movie (I say “as of now” because I’ll be watching it in about an hour when I convince my mom to rent it for me), and I didn’t know much about the book, either. There isn’t much I can say without spoiling anything if you’re planning on reading it, because this book was extremely surprising to me, so I’ll just copy the summary from the back of the book:

“If you start to read this book, you will go on a journey with a nine-year-old boy named Bruno. (Though this isn’t a book for nine-year-olds.) And sooner or later you will arrive with Bruno at a fence.

Fences like this exist all over the world. We hope you never have to encounter one.”

Well, there you have it. From that kind of description, all you know is the main character’s name and that he discovers a fence. And that’s the best you’ll get out of me, because I refuse to spoil such a great book for anyone who doesn’t know what it’s about. If there’s one book you read this year, please make it this one. You won’t regret it, and it’ll change your view on things you never thought could change.

-J

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