Tag Archives: psychic/superpowers

The Giver by Lois Lowry

The Giver

“They were satisfied with their lives which had none of the vibrance his own was taking on. And he was angry at himself, that he could not change that for them.”

The Giver tells the story of Jonas, an eleven-year-old boy living in a utopian society. Each year at the Ceremony of Twelve, all Elevens receive their career paths, but Jonas has an important task– he is to train with the Receiver of Memory, the most respected Elder in the community who has the job of storing all memories of the past. But as Jonas gets further into his training, he discovers all of the secrets his society is hiding, and how nearly all of the community is living in a black-and-white world (literally).

I hope that was an adequate summary– this is one of those books that is really hard to describe without excessive spoilers. I really enjoyed the book: the symbolism, the foreshadowing, everything. My only problem with the entire book was the “big twist” that I “definitely wouldn’t see coming,” which I suspected from the very beginning.

The thing that came as a big surprise to me– and probably what made me love the book so much– wasn’t a turn-of-events or anything like that; it was the thing about color that I alluded to in the description above. You really have to pay attention to detail to pick up on the fact that everyone in the society is completely color-blind. The way the author uses words like “dull” and “colorless”– they aren’t just plain adjectives, they’re literal. The way the author talks about sometimes Jonas sees things change— he’s seeing small glimpses of color. It’s crazy, and it’s subtle, but it becomes a major plot point later on in the story.

Also, like many other books I’ve been reviewing lately, I’ve just found out a film adaption is being made. (You’d think with a book from 1993 that’s so popular, there would already have been a movie.) It stars Jeff Bridges as the Giver, which I’m extremely excited about, and as soon as I see the movie (which won’t be until sometime in 2014… sigh), you guys will hear about it. See you soon!

-J

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The Immortals Series by Alyson Noel (Evermore, Blue Moon, Shadowland, Dark Flame, Night Star, Everlasting)

The Immortals Series

“Today’s worries are yesterday’s fears and tomorrow’s stories.” 

I’m not sure how many of you guys read my little note on my 100 Book Challenge page, but in case you didn’t and don’t feel like going back, I’ll just give you a quick explanation. I was planning on rereading Heaven Is for Real, that short and sweet book that’s been crazy popular for a while now, and reviewing it for you guys in a whiny but professional manner– as I usually do when I dislike a book, even a little bit. However, constant family issues and other personal problems posed a threat. I was a complete mess for a while and didn’t once think about my blogs. So one day, while I was a little cooled off, I decided to cancel the 100 Book Challenge and take a break from blogging for a while. And during my break, I finally finished Heaven Is for Real (it took me nine days total because of everything that was going on– which is sort of embarrassing considering that book is tiny) and reread the Hunger Games series and Immortals series. (No reviews for the Hunger Games series, though, just because I don’t know what I would say other than how much I love the books and how much I’m in love with the character of Finnick.)

But what I really came here to say is: Break’s over, guys. J’s back. And now, it’s back to the most popular time on this blog: reviewing time.

The Immortals series is an action-packed fantasy told from the point of view of Ever Bloom, a sixteen-year-old who recently lost her family to a devastating car crash. Ever wades through her new life in California, hiding beneath loud music and hoods to block out the constant noise that comes with the psychic powers she gained after the near-death experience. That is, until she meets Damen, who seems to be the one person that she can’t read– the one person who silences everything around her– the one person she can’t help but feel attracted to. But Damen is hiding a secret himself, and when it is revealed, it will change both of their lives forever.

Considering the name of the series, I highly doubt what I’m about to mention would be considered a spoiler. But, if you’re still determined not to learn a single thing that could be “spoiler-ish”, you may want to stop reading now.

In the first book, Evermore, we get a background on Ever’s life and how she adjusts to her new school and powers. She uses loud music to block out the endless stream of thoughts coming from everyone around her, avoids touching people at all costs for risk of seeing their entire life story, and learns to deal with seeing everyone’s aura and talking to the ghost of her little sister, Riley (who, eventually, got her own series, which I haven’t read yet but would really like to). Then we meet Damen, who arouses Ever’s suspicions when she can’t read his mind, can’t see his aura, and gets nothing with a touch. He seems to read her mind at times, taking her suspicions even further until he reveals his secret: Damen is immortal, and had made Ever immortal after the crash that claimed her family.

There’s never a dull moment in this six-part series, which constantly reveals new secrets, problems, and enemies. It’s exciting, it’s romantic, it’s philosophical– it’s everything you could ask for in a fantasy series. And just when you think you know everything, a new problem appears.

Just like with most series I read, the final book, Everlasting, was my favorite. After everything that had happened in the previous novels, I constantly wondered what Alyson Noel could do for a big finale without turning one of my favorite characters against them (as she had previously done, but I won’t get into that). The series definitely went out with a bang, though, and I loved every minute of it.

Although, numerous Goodreads users disagree entirely. I’d say it’s about a fourth of the readers out there that hate this series with a passion. I can tell they’re frustrated because Ever always seems to make terrible decisions under pressure– but Alyson Noel has her admit to it being her weak point, and besides, without terrible decisions, how could there be a plot in the first place? So yes, Immortals series-haters, I do understand where you’re coming from, because Ever’s decisions have frustrated me beyond belief as well. But everyone makes bad decisions at some point in their lives, and Alyson Noel is just acting upon this common weakness.

And before I wrap this review up and head off to bed, I want to take a minute to mention two things about Alyson Noel’s writing– one compliment, one constructive criticism. The compliment: I love how she uses unusual names for her characters. And although she does use them frequently in these books, she also uses them in other books– though I’ve yet to read all but one. A couple of my favorite names she has used are Echo, Ever, Haven, Evangeline, Misa, Rafe, Honor, Adelina, and Roman.

Now, some quick constructive criticism. Alyson Noel tends to recycle a lot of phrases when describing things, which tends to get somewhat annoying. While I’m writing this, two big examples are jumping out at me: the Shadowland and the Great Halls of Learning. The Shadowland first came into play in the eponymous third novel of the series, Shadowland, and was described as “The Shadowland. The home for lost souls.” And in every book since then, that’s exactly how she describes it. Along with the Great Halls of Learning, which, during their first appearance in Blue Moon, the second installment of the series, were described using the same monuments and repetition of the word “facade”. And guess how she describes it in every other book it appears in?

Anyway, I think that’s enough for tonight. I hope you enjoyed my review, hope it was worth it after all of the time I’ve been off. And, although I just came back, I’m going on vacation soon, which basically means I won’t have time or a way to review. I’m using this time to reread the Harry Potter series, if I can, which I was planning to do soon anyway but would cause me to disappear for a while again. But since I recently got four new books, and have at least three that I’ve read but haven’t reviewed yet, I promise I’ll return with more reviews as soon as possible. Until then, keep enjoying the summer! 🙂

-J

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Hate List by Jennifer Brown

Hate List

“We all got to be winners sometimes. But what he didn’t understand was that we all had to be losers, too. Because you can’t have one without the other.”
-Valerie

Valerie and her boyfriend Nick, two outsiders who are picked on by virtually everyone in their high school, compose an ever-growing list of people and things they hate as a method of venting frustration. But one day, Nick brings a gun to school and starts to shoot many of the students on the list. After months of interrogation and recovery, Valerie is ready to go back to school for her senior year– but will her fellow classmates hold her actions against her?

The idea of whether Valerie is guilty of anything is for you to decide, but regardless of your decision, her story is a remarkable one. Valerie goes through so much throughout the span of the novel, from watching her fellow classmates and boyfriend die to being interviewed by persistent police officers to trying to lead a normal life once again. Her story is inspiring and hopeful, with an ending that is absolutely beautiful.

I was going to tell you guys about my theory that Bea is an angel, but I’ll skip over it and instead talk about the author’s note, specifically how Jennifer Brown named her characters symbolically. The examples she used were as follows (direct quotes, not my words):

Valerie’s last name is Leftman because she was “left” to take the rap for Nick’s actions. Nick’s last name is Levil, which is almost “evil,” and may even look like “evil” at first glance, but if you go back and look again… it’s not quite “evil.” Principal Angerson was an angry kind of dude. Angela Dash was a crummy reporter, just “dashing” off stories without double-checking her facts. Bea had no last name. She was just Bea (or Just Be). Detective Panzella was named after an Italian bread salad (panzanella), because he was about as plain as a bowl full of day-old bread. And, of course, Dr. Hieler, pronounced “healer,” is pretty self-explanatory.

So there you have it. Everything makes much more sense if you know the characters, of course, but you see where I’m coming from. The idea of imagery or symbollism hidden in names is really cool, in my opinion, and it gave me a great idea for my writings. (Yes, I’m thinking about writing a book or two. Go on and laugh; I don’t blame you.)

Sorry it took so long for me to post this review. I sat down to write it at about eight, then got distracted and watched the new movie Side Effects (which was incredible, by the way). Then, after the movie was over, I began writing again, explaining my entire theory on Bea. I deleted it shortly after finishing it, realizing how awkward it sounded, and was once again distracted by all of the fan theory articles I’d found across the web. Oh well; hopefully the review was fine, regardless of my constant distractions and revisions. Have a great night, everyone, and I’ll see you in a few days. 🙂

-J

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The Crank Series by Ellen Hopkins (Crank, Glass, Fallout)

CrankGlassFallout

“Crank is more than a drug. It’s a way of life. You can turn your back. But you can never really walk away.”
-Kristina/Bree, Crank

So I’ve done it. After thinking about it for 50+ reviews,  I’ve finally made a full series post. Now this is as weird for you as it is for me, so please bear with me as I try this out.

The first book in the series, Crank, tells the story of Kristina, described as “gifted high school junior, quiet, never any trouble.” One day, when she decides to visit the father who has been missing all of her life, she discovers a powerful drug: crystal meth. Soon Kristina’s life is changed forever as she falls deeper into lies, trouble, and addiction.

In Glass, Kristina continues to struggle with her addiction, but with all new problems. As everything around her falls apart, she’ll have to find new ways to get with the monster, and they won’t be pretty.

Fallout takes place nineteen years after the events in Crank, and is told by Kristina’s teenage children, Hunter, Autumn, and Summer. Although their lives are completely different, they have one thing in common: their mother has torn their families apart, forcing them to live separately (and in some cases, without knowledge of each other). But when their paths intersect, their individual lives will be changed forever.

These books are impossible to put down. I know I would’ve had them all read within a few days if it weren’t for my final exams this week. The series is, like Ellen Hopkins’s other novels, not for the faint-hearted, and as real as it gets. Also, I commend the author for her incredible talent of being able to write a teenager’s point of view flawlessly, no matter the subject matter or age range.

The character of Kristina in the first book, Crank, was especially relatable to me due to the description of her personality (quoted above), and I think that made me like the first book a lot more. It is really interesting to see how someone like Kristina could turn down the dark road of crystal meth so easily, and how it affects everyone around her. By Glass, though, the story starts to drag on a little. It feels like most of it is being repeated, or that the words don’t matter and are only there to take up space. I became bored with this book very quickly, and feared that the final book of the series would be even worse. But, I can gratefully tell you, Fallout was my favorite of the three.

The narrator change is what made Fallout interesting to me right from the start. Books are always more exciting with separate narrators, considering you have three different voices, three different points of view, three different lives instead of one throughout the whole 500+ page novel. But the change in narrator wasn’t the only thing that made this addition the best.

Although it makes me upset to finish a series, the final book is usually my favorite. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows of the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling, Everlasting of the Immortals series by Alyson Noel, and Fallout of the Crank series by Ellen Hopkins all have that in common, for two main reasons: one, the climax is biggest and best thing the author can possibly think of; and two, the author always finds a way to tie all of the previous events together perfectly. This denouement, as my English teacher says, is so exciting to me. And the final book in the Crank series fits this description well.

I hope this extra-long series review was worth the thirteen-day wait for me to post again. This review was exhausting, so I think I’m going to stick with some single books for a while until I’m ready for another hour-long reviewing session. Please let me know what you think of the series review style and whether you think I should do this for every series I review. Thank you so much for reading, and have a great summer!

-J

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Wintergirls by Laurie Halse Anderson

Wintergirls

“I could say I’m excited, but that would be a lie. The number doesn’t matter. If I got down to 070.00, I’d want to be 065.00. If I weighed 010.00, I wouldn’t be happy until I got down to 005.00. The only number that would ever be enough is 0.”
-Lia

When best friends Lia and Cassie begin a contest to see who can be the skinniest, everything goes downhill. After not speaking to each other for months, Lia discovers that her best friend has died. Now alone, Lia struggles to recovver from Cassie’s death and her ongoing anorexia before she disappears.

Although I really dislike the title, Wintergirls is one of those incredible heartbreaking books that you can’t help but read more than once. The story is extremely depressing, as is Lia’s eating disorder and self-harm, but in a way it’s also sort of inspiring.

I know this is a very, very short review, but there isn’t a whole lot to say. This is the most accurate portrayal of an eating disorder that I’ve found so far, along with numerous other struggles, so this should be your number one choice if you’re looking for a story about dealing with an eating disorder. Other than that, this is just an all-around good book and I believe it should be read by absolutely everyone. People need to understand the difficulties that others go through, and this would definitely show them.

-J

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Jay’s Journal by Beatrice Sparks

Jay's Journal

“Why so much hate in your mind when love is the only way to straighten things out?”
-Jay

This is the “real” diary of a teenager named Jay as he becomes interested in the occult, “edited” by Beatrice Sparks. The quotations may have given away that I think the validity of this book is utter crap. Sure, it may have been loosely based on a real diary, but I’m talking very loosely. And it’s not because I don’t believe something like this could happen, because I’m open to all possibilities; it’s the writing style that gives it away. First of all, another of Beatrice Sparks’s “discovered and edited” books I’ve read, Go Ask Alice, is written in the same exact way as this one. The constant repitition of words three times feels like it’s obsessive-compulsive. Constantly capitalizing or emphasizing certain words, random poems, and incredible vocabulary are not the things that you find in the average teen’s journal. Just saying.

Other than the unreal quality, I think it was an overall good book. Some parts were actually very creepy, which is why I tagged this book under horror even though I don’t think I’d consider it wholly horror. The same reason I tagged psychic, considering the powers of witchcraft and altering the future, etc.

There were some graphic rituals described with a lot of detail, so if you’re squeamish I’d suggest you to stay away from this book. Also, if you’re extremely creeped out by Satanism, demons, and all that fun stuff, don’t even go near this book. Honestly, it would probably scar you for life. But what else can you expect from a book about demonic cults?

-J

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Coraline by Neil Gaiman

Coraline

““I don’t want whatever I want. Nobody does. Not really. What kind of fun would it be if I just got everything I ever wanted just like that, and it didn’t mean anything? What then?”
-Coraline Jones

After moving into a new home, Coraline discovers a door that leads to nothing but a brick wall. But later, when she returns to the door, she finds that it leads to something completely different: an entirely new world where the people have buttons for eyes and no one mispronounces her name. In this world, where animals can talk and her parents always have time for her, everything seems much better than reality. But everything is not what it seems…

You’re probably more familiar with the claymation movie based off of this book than the book itself. There are a number of differences between the two, although both are great. Neil Gaiman is an extremely talented and imaginative author, and I really enjoy reading his works.

If you remember the movie, the first thing that should come to mind is how scary it was. Even though I was eleven when I first watched it, I remember it as the most terrifying animation movie I had ever seen. Even my mother, who was probably thirty-five, was shocked at how disturbing it was. The book was significantly less scary, due to the lack of Other-Mother-turning-into-a-spider scenes. The illustrations in this book weren’t the most comforting, though.

-J

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Girl in the Arena by Lise Haines

Girl in the Arena

Let me just start off by saying I have no idea how to describe this book. It doesn’t seem dystopian, but at the same time it does. It’s not a love story, but it’s somewhat about love. It’s just so hard to explain this book, so please bear with me while I try my best.

In a world where gladiator-style fighting is the most popular sport, Lyn is a celebrity. Her nickname, “the Daughter of Seven Gladiators,” comes from the fact that her mother remarried seven times, each time to a gladiator that she lost in the arena. Lyn’s current stepfather, Tommy, has a big match coming up against an extremely gifted fighter; she is so worried that she lends Tommy her dowry bracelet for good luck. When Tommy is killed in the arena, his opponent picks up the bracelet, forcing Lyn to marry him by law– unless she fights him herself.

Girl in the Arena was a lot better than I expected it to be, and full of action. Throughout the book, Lyn is faced with so many problems, including the death of her seventh stepfather (which, by law, means that her mother cannot remarry), caring for her autistic brother Thad, and training with her best friend Mark (whom, I believe, she has feelings for). Just when you think she’s solved a problem, another one pops up in a consistent cycle of suspense.

I’ll go ahead and recommend this to any fans of The Hunger Games series, in case you didn’t expect how similar they seem.

-J

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