Tag Archives: abduction

The Hush, Hush Series by Becca Fitzpatrick (Hush, Hush, Crescendo, Silence, Finale)

“Any happiness, no matter how brief, seemed better than the long, simmering torture of waking up day after day, knowing I could never have him.”
-Nora

Romance was not part of Nora Grey’s plan. She’s never been particularly attracted to the boys at her school, no matter how hard her best friend, Vee, pushes them at her. Not until Patch comes along. With his easy smile and eyes that seem to see inside her, Patch draws Nora to him against her better judgment. But after a series of terrifying encounters, Nora’s not sure whom to trust. Patch seems to be everywhere she is and seems to know more about her than her closest friends. She can’t decide whether she should fall into his arms or run and hide. And when she tries to seek some answers, she finds herself near a truth that is way more unsettling than anything Patch makes her feel.

I’m a little lazy today, so that summary is directly from Goodreads.com. Considering the cover art of the series pictured above, I don’t think it’s a spoiler to tell you that Patch is a fallen angel. I mean, it’s almost screaming it at you. So, not only are there fallen angels in this fantasy world, there are also fallen angel-human hybrids called Nephilim, and that’s where it gets tricky. Basically, fallen angels can possess the body of a Nephil during the Jewish month of Cheshvan (which I’ve tried to look up and figure out exactly when it is, but so far, I’ve got nothing) if they swear fealty to the fallen angel. This will, in turn, make them immortal, like the fallen angel who possesses them. Fallen angels and Nephilim generally despise each other, not only due to the possession, but the fact that fallen angels created Nephilim.

I can’t say much more without destroying the plot of the entire series, but that’s the main premise. Also, fallen angels can’t physically feel, so there’s the whole forbidden love thing. You get the idea. So how about the actual review?

Honestly, I have mixed feelings about the series. I remember when I read Hush, Hush for the first time, I absolutely loved it and couldn’t wait to get the sequel. About a year later, I re-read Hush, Hush and read Crescendo for the first time, and I remember loving it just as much. But recently, when I got Silence and Finale and read the entire series, my feelings about them had changed. Maybe I read them too many times, maybe I grew out of them, and maybe it’s the fact that I was reading multiple books in a row. Who knows? The thing is, I really didn’t like them very much, and I struggled to finish Silence because it was so boring for so long. And once I’d finally finished that one, I didn’t even want to read Finale. I was so sick of the entire series that I was ready to just give up, write a terrible review on half of the series to emphasize my hatred with the previous book, and be done with the whole ordeal. But, I didn’t. And in a way, I’m glad I didn’t, because Finale was definitely the best of all four novels and the only one I didn’t feel like I was wasting my time reading. The suspense leading up to the main plot point is great, the training is great, and the characters have visibly matured since the first installment.

I’d say overall, not bad. Some parts were cliché, yes, but others were great. Some well-liked characters I hated, but others I liked. The series was meh, excluding Finale.

Now, a little pathetic apology note: I actually finished the series yesterday, and I don’t really have an excuse for why I didn’t write the review then. However, between then and now I finished another book, which I’m currently multi-tasking on writing the review for and getting distracted on Tumblr. It’ll definitely be up before I go to bed, though, and it’s a good one.

Anyway, guys, thanks for reading, and I’ll be back soon with another review!

-J

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Coraline by Neil Gaiman

Coraline

““I don’t want whatever I want. Nobody does. Not really. What kind of fun would it be if I just got everything I ever wanted just like that, and it didn’t mean anything? What then?”
-Coraline Jones

After moving into a new home, Coraline discovers a door that leads to nothing but a brick wall. But later, when she returns to the door, she finds that it leads to something completely different: an entirely new world where the people have buttons for eyes and no one mispronounces her name. In this world, where animals can talk and her parents always have time for her, everything seems much better than reality. But everything is not what it seems…

You’re probably more familiar with the claymation movie based off of this book than the book itself. There are a number of differences between the two, although both are great. Neil Gaiman is an extremely talented and imaginative author, and I really enjoy reading his works.

If you remember the movie, the first thing that should come to mind is how scary it was. Even though I was eleven when I first watched it, I remember it as the most terrifying animation movie I had ever seen. Even my mother, who was probably thirty-five, was shocked at how disturbing it was. The book was significantly less scary, due to the lack of Other-Mother-turning-into-a-spider scenes. The illustrations in this book weren’t the most comforting, though.

-J

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Saving Zoe by Alyson Noel

Saving Zoe

“But I’ve strayed so far from normal now, I’ll never find my way back. And the truth is, I no longer want to.”
-Echo

Before reading Saving Zoe, I was already a little biased on Alyson Noel. I read her Immortals series (which I’ll be reviewing on here eventually) and absolutely loved it, so I had high expectations of this book. And, just as I expected, I wasn’t at all disappointed.

Saving Zoe tells of Echo, an almost-fifteen-year old girl whose sister, Zoe, was murdered about a year ago. As Echo adjusts to her life in high school, her sister’s old boyfriend gives her Zoe’s diary that she’d left at his house before she was murdered. Echo reads through the diary, discovering things she never knew about her sister, and some things that strangely connect with her own life.

With every book I love, there’s always at least one thing, even something very very minor, that I’ll dislike. Yes, these are minor things, but I’m getting them out of the way now because that’s what reviews are for. The two small things that annoyed me about this book: Zoe’s expression “thank G” in replacement of “thank god”, and Alyson Noel’s apparent obsession with cobalt blue. Literally any time a color is mentioned in the book, it’s cobalt blue. And it’s so repetitive. This annoyed me beyond words.

Other than those minor problems, this book was incredible. The connections between Zoe’s diary and Echo’s current life will keep you on the edge of your seat and prevent you from putting the book down. Judging by the fact that I read all but the first few chapters in one day, I’d call it a success.

(Also, and I didn’t notice this until recently, but be prepared for a lot of dying-related books in the future. I didn’t realize I had so many unread books with close to the same topic. I’ve only got about fifteen Christmas books left, so I’ll try to space them out as best as I can, but try not to hold a grudge if it doesn’t work out. 🙂 )

-J

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